Fly-Ash Bricks
May31

Fly-Ash Bricks

Our Homes are Our Dreams made of Bricks and Mortar With the concept of sustainable living catching up, this catchphrase might need a slight twist – Our Homes are Our Dreams made of Fly-ash Bricks and Mortar. Fly-ash Bricks are Eco-friendly Bricks FABs (Fly-ash Bricks) are eco-friendly bricks and that’s what makes them the most viable option in this day and age of Green Living. They have two major advantages over clay bricks. One, they are stronger than clay bricks and two, being made of fly-ash, a by-product of coal based power generating plants which was earlier a nuisance to dispose, they are good for the environment too. FAB is a “green” product which is helping save precious landfill space which was earlier being used to dispose unused fly-ash. Now, that unused ash is being used to manufacture bricks. What’s more important is that these bricks, especially, ‘the fly-ash sand lime bricks’ can be manufactured the green way. In this method the fly-ash mixes with lime at ambient temperature while the brick cures. These bricks are air cured for 24-48 hours and then steam cured in autoclave at desired pressure and temperature. This is a sustainable manufacturing process. There’s another process in which ‘the burnt-clay fly-ash bricks’ are made and fired in a kiln at about 1000 degree Celsius. The previous method is a sustainable one, saves energy, and also reduces mercury pollution. Both types of bricks are being manufactured though most people are adopting the sustainable method to manufacture ‘the fly-ash sand lime bricks’. Even when these bricks are not being manufactured in the greenest possible way, they still are saving the environment from fly-ash – an industrial waste and a pollutant. Fly-ash Bricks Vs Clay Bricks Practitioners of sustainable living are in favour of fly-ash bricks, because they are eco-friendly, but that’s not all. Fly-ash bricks are becoming popular, because they have many advantages over conventional clay bricks. Here are a few: They have dense composition and high compressive strength which gives them higher load bearing capacity They are uniform in shape and size and have a smooth finish. They help saving in mortar up to 25%  mortar and saving in plaster up to 15% , because of even shape and size. They have higher moisture resistance, as their water absorption ability is much lower than clay bricks. This reduces chances of dampness on walls. They are less porous and have a thermal conductivity of 0.90-1.05 W/m2°C as opposed to the thermal conductivity of clay bricks which is 1.25 – 1.35 W/m2 ºC. Thus, they have better thermal insulation than clay bricks. They don’t absorb heat; rather, they reflect...

Read More
Emergence of Dwarka Expressway
May28

Emergence of Dwarka Expressway

With the growing urban population across the National Capital Region and increasing preference of consumers to stay closer to work places as well as opt for hassle free & faster routes to work places, prompted Haryana Urban Development Authority (HUDA) to commission  an eight-lane expressway, known as Dwarka Expressway also known as the Northern Peripheral Road. The Dwarka Expressway Corridor starting at Dwarka, New Delhi and terminates at Kherki Dhaula on NH-8, Gurgaon has turned out to be a big attraction for real estate developers, investors and end users alike in the last 4-5 years. The entire Expressway stretch will act as an alternate link road between Delhi and Gurgaon. The biggest influential role the expressway is expected to play is to ease the traffic situation on the Delhi-Gurgaon Expressway. The entire 18 km long expressway project is being developed by India bulls Group under public private partnership (PPP). Backed by powerful infrastructure development plan for the stretch, Dwarka-Gurgaon Expressway is now registering the biggest real estate development. The eight lanes, 150 meter wide and 18 km long Dwarka Expressway will play an important role for the daily commuters from Delhi to Gurgaon and vice versa. The expressway will be providing them a congestion free travel especially when the Delhi- Gurgaon Expressway has witnessed highest number in traffic volume growth. Once finished, Dwarka Expressway is expected to be one of the best motorways to journey from Delhi to Manesar. Real Estate Developers with their projects in Dwarka, Gurgaon and along the Expressway are depending on the completion of the Expressway project to get them the desired return on investment (ROI). More than 33,000 houses are under construction along different sectors of Dwarka-Gurgaon Expressway. Around 50% of the expected houses will be ready for possession in the next 12-18 months period. Proximity to the IGI airport, the Delhi Aero City, and the forthcoming Diplomatic Enclave in Dwarka, the Dwarka Expressway has achieved similar growth rate curve as premium Gurgaon locations like Golf Course Extension Road and National Highway (NH)-8. With the increasing number of corporates & MNC’s operating out of Gurgaon, coupled with the locational advantages, Dwarka-Gurgaon Expressway has emerged as an attractive alternative destination for residential users eyeing either Dwarka or Gurgaon. Dwarka Expressway, a boon to real estate The completion of Dwarka-Gurgaon Expressway will give huge boost to the real estate development in this area. As a number of properties start getting completed on this expressway, more and more end users will be interested to moving here. Over the period of time, Dwarka Expressway will evolve into a seamlessly prime real estate destination for variety of end users...

Read More
The Importance of Practicing Recycling
May26

The Importance of Practicing Recycling

Recycling – An Environment Friendly Approach Recycling is the production of new products or materials from (recyclable) materials that would otherwise be considered waste. The process of recycling includes collecting recyclable materials, sorting them out, and sending different materials to different areas for processing. These processed raw materials are then sent to manufacturing units where different kinds of products are made from them. Today, you find more and more recycled products being used everywhere. Some of these products have total recycled content and some have partial recycled content. Common house hold items that are made from recycled material include newspaper, tissue paper, paper napkins, aluminium rolls, plastic containers and bottles, paper bags, steel cans etc. Key Benefits Recycling is a key strategy to reduce solid waste that is sent to landfills and incinerators. However, there are other benefits of recycling too – It helps conserve natural resources such as wood, water, and minerals It reduces pollution by reducing the consumption and need to collect new raw materials It reduces energy usage It reduces greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide and methane) emissions that are major reasons for global warming It helps sustain the environment It promotes the use of green technologies It has created new employment opportunities in the recycling and manufacturing industries world over. Recycling helps economy. The 3R’s – Reduce…Reuse…Recycle Recycling can’t be viewed in isolation. It is one of the waste management options in the solid waste hierarchy and therefore, when you think of recycling, you should think of all the three components (reduce, reuse, and recycle) as one whole idea. In a waste hierarchy, the waste management options are ranked from the most sustainable to the least sustainable. In this hierarchy “reducing” is the best option and “disposal” the worst. Reduce – If you don’t need something, don’t get it and prevent waste.  The first step towards zero waste is to reduce production of waste.  For instance, people tend to get too much food stuff from the market (even things they don’t consume much) and then they have to throw away some of these food items, as their usability date expires. This wastage can be reduced if you buy only those food items that are more likely to be consumed. Reducing waste is as simple as this example.  The aim is that individuals and communities reduce waste, recycle more, and use resources sustainably. Reuse – If you have to buy something, buy something that can be used again. Reusing is using things again and again in their original form. A good example is using reusable nappies (real nappies) as against the disposable ones, because a disposable nappy...

Read More
Cooling Homes Naturally
May23

Cooling Homes Naturally

The searing sun scorches the Indian sub continent in the summer months of May and June. Temperatures in some parts of the country can soar as high as 45 to 48 0C. The challenge then, for most Indians, is to keep their indoors cool when outside the sun is beating down mercilessly on their homes.  Using air conditioners and air-coolers is one way to keep the homes cool, but with people becoming conscious about energy conservation, they are looking for alternative ways to keep their homes cool. This helps in two ways – reducing energy consumption and reducing carbon emitting gases. Besides, if the temperature inside your home is at least 10 degrees cooler than outside, your need for air-conditioning and cooling will be less and whenever you would use these cooling devices, they will be more effective. Passive Cooling Stay cool and save energy with natural and passive cooling techniques. Passive cooling includes all natural processes and techniques for cooling buildings, but some of the techniques can be applied to houses. The underlying principle of passive cooling is to prevent heat from entering into the building and to remove it once it has entered. With passive cooling you can maintain a comfortable indoor temperature without the use of mechanical methods. It lowers energy consumption but increases the efficiency and applicability of the systems. Passive cooling technique creates a high degree of thermal comfort in three ways – (i) by reducing heat gains, (ii) by modifying heat gains and (iii) by removing internal heat. Reducing Heat Gains Passive cooling gives thermal comfort by reducing heat gains. This can be done through – Solar protection techniques such as rooftop gardens, green walls, and green roofs for their cooling effect. Presence of water bodies, plants, and trees near your homes (landscaping of surrounding areas) contribute to microclimate cooling which can lower the temperature around your house by 5° C. Vegetation lowers temperature and increases the relative humidity of air. This helps keep the internal temperature of the house low. Light coloured terrace floors and outer walls also help in reducing heat gain. Using reflective materials on roofs such as white ceramic tiles, white vinyl, or white cement can cool your roofs by reflecting sunlight; this simple method can lower your indoor temperature by 5-6 °C, which is great. Similarly, the practice of lime coating the roof tops and roof ponds in houses in hot and arid Rajasthan are the ingenuous ways of reducing roof temperature. Using shading techniques for exclusion of solar radiation from exteriors of the house is of vital importance to keep the indoor temperatures low. Shading is especially...

Read More
Nice Corridor Bangalore
May21

Nice Corridor Bangalore

The addition of NICE corridor to the city of Bangalore symbolizes rapid development of infrastructure to the city and ensures to support the growth opportunities in the IT hub of the country. The Bangalore-Mysore Expressway as it is known otherwise is a proposed 4 to 6 lane private tolled expressway. It forms an important link between the two cities in Karnataka, Mysore and Bangalore. The entire project is being developed by Nandi Infrastructure Corridor Enterprise (NICE). The plan is to build and develop a 6 lane expressway between Bangalore city and Mysore city. The expressway is planned to be 111 km long with a 9.1km link road into downtown Bangalore. NICE will collect toll and maintain the expressway after its completion. The six-lane expressways will consist of the following parts: The outer peripheral road of Bangalore is 109km long. The southern section of the outer peripheral road which is almost 41km is already completed and developed by NICE. This part of the road runs in between the NH-7, also known as the Hosur Road which provides connectivity to Chennai and NH-4, also known as the Tumkur Road which provides connectivity to Mumbai. The link road which is 9km long connects the outer peripheral road to Bangalore city at Outer Ring Road near Banashankri Phase 6 also known as Hoskeralli presently and further down will merge with  State Highway SH-17 also known as Mysore Road. A 3km stretch of elevated link road would connect the existing link road to downtown Bangalore at Town Hall / MG Road. This section of the road is yet to commence work. 111km of Bangalore-Mysore expressway, connecting, Mysore city and Bangalore city at the outer peripheral road. The work is still in progress and will be completed in the next two to three years.  Features: Some of the features of the expressway and the NICE project include an integrated Real Estate Development Master Plan. Five townships have been proposed to south of Mysore Road (SH17) which are to subsidize the expressway costs. The nature of the townships proposed include some of the best facility centers: Corporate Centre Commercial Centre Industrial Centre Heritage Centre Eco-Tourism Centre The addition of infrastructure to the city of Bangalore, will help to decongest the over populating city. With a slew of growth opportunities planned along the corridor, the end users will be focusing on the new areas, thereby reducing pressure on the existing city. The futuristic infrastructure planned and developed along the corridor is sufficient to support the demand pressure of the population growth for next 2-3 decades. It is estimated that the proposed townships will accommodate approximately 2mn people...

Read More